Sunday, February 5, 2017

"YOU'VE GOT A NEW CONVERT" / LEARNING 'GOOSE' SWING IS NOT HARD / SAVE YOUR KNEES HIPS AND BACK WITH THE MONGOOSE GOLF SWING. DO IT!!


I haven't posted to this blog for some time. I was completing my books: www.firstsoundpress.com. As an introductory offer I'm giving away a 411 page book Bucket Work in the Sea of Eternity FREE. Simply click on the link above and download the FREE book.

Meet Steve. Steve has been a golfer for many years ...tried a number of swing techniques. Now claims: "You have a new convert." He has approached learning the Mongoose Golf Swing as correctly as anyone in the history of its existence - and certainly those of you interested in learning the 'Goose' will do well to read his comments below.

"I have tried most swings known to man including a split grip. I would have epiphanies but too many crappy  shots -- especially with the driver. Would hit under the ball and get that 'nice' short pop up and ugly ball mark on top of the driver.

If I understand what you are describing -- does the backswing feel like one is pushing down on the club handle with the lead hand and pulling with the trail hand to get to the top of the backswing? Is this the leveraging? The downswing would be kind of the reverse where the trail hand pushes down and around -- the lead hand isn't very active and kind of 'goes along for the ride?' The release is the right hand/forearm crossing over the left one (I am right handed). I would hit some great shots especially with irons and hybrids but as you stated couldn't get the driver to work with any consistency."

(A FEW DAYS LATER) ....

"You have a new convert. I remember Peter Jacobson - good golfer - I think he has at least one replaced joint. The conventional swing has too much tongue compression - twisting etc. - too violent [on the body]. 

I am strong in the arms/hands and always intuitively wanted to hit the ball in this manner--maybe I was all hands and not enough hip/shoulder turn.

Your swing felt compact and short without bracing - resisting etc. Hit two buckets without any pain or discomfort. 

Watched the tutorial a third time and reviewed some blog notes then went to the range."

(AND AFTER A  FEW MORE DAYS) ...

"Hit slow/short shots for 20 minutes -- very easy to pitch and chip -- also worked well from sand.

Went to the range -- swinging split-handed is something I have played with so this was easy to adapt to. Needed to remember to turn through ball and come at the ball at a steep / 45* angle.

There are no bad lies with this method -- as someone who swept the ball, I hated playing off tight lies. With this method, every ball is a nail and its just a matter of hitting down at the 45* or so angle. This already is a great epiphany.

Compression is very distinct from the way I used to hit it. I see why the cue of hitting with the heel is essential. I hit shots with the long hybrid I could never do before -- the ball comes off hot with a [low] boring flight -- the feeling from the club through the hands is brand new as is the ball flight--this goes for all the clubs.

For me, the back swing is performed by pushing down on the top of grip w/ lead hand and pulling back w/ trail hand(leveraging/teeter totter. I used this for all shots--sand, chip all the way up to the 12 degree driver.

Swing feels like a punch/throw/axe swing with my body weight behing it down at the ball with the leverage / teeter-totter hand action near inpact--when done correctly--wow; straight, well struck  and long (for me) shots. Whats not to like?

Never thought about takeaway, stance, feet, etc -- see ball, hit ball. This was great--you dont have to think about throwing a ball, shooting a basketball, catching a football. Now I can stand over the ball and just go after it. I find its easy to adjust for mis-hits as there is so little moving parts.

In all--I'm sold.This is a great way to play -- especially for those of us who don't have time to hone our games for hours. With some more practice, the best is yet to come. Thank you for your great ideas--any comments would be appreciated.

Thanks--

Steve"

Photo credit: Johnny Silvercloud via Foter.com / CC BY-SA